Recognize that sinking feeling you get when you land face-first in a snowbank and the snow gets inside your jacket? Dreading that moment after a challenging run when your sweat cools down and you start to shiver? The best long underwear for skiing will insulate you while wicking away moisture from your body, meaning you can stay comfortable and confident in any situation.

Here at the Adventure Junkies, we want to make it easy for you to choose your long underwear. Temperatures out on the slopes can range from freezing to warm in a matter of minutes, so it’s important to have a good base layer when you’re skiing or snowboarding. Check out our handy guide for tips on finding the perfect long underwear for skiing.

For more of out top snow sports gear recommendations, check out these popular articles: 

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Jackets | Pants | Socks | Gloves | Hats

 

 

 

QUICK ANSWER – THE BEST LONG UNDERWEAR FOR SKIING 

1. Icebreaker Oasis

2. Patagonia Capilene 

3. Icebreaker Zone

4. Mammut Klamath

5. Smartwool Nts Mid 250

6. Arc’Teryx Phase Ar

7. Rei Co-Op Heavyweight

8. Patagonia Capilene Thermal Weight

9. Under Armour Base 2.0

10. Terramar 2.0 Thermolator

 

 

 

SKI UNDERWEAR REVIEWS

ICEBREAKER OASIS

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Base layer for mild or changing temperatures

WOMEN’S VERSION: Icebreaker Oasis

WEIGHT: Lightweight

FABRIC: Merino wool

PROS: Chafe-free seams, UPF 50+, ethically sourced wool, excellent temperature adjustment, don’t lose shape, virtually odorless, durable

CONS: Requires proper care, expensive, fits tight

 

 

 

PATAGONIA CAPILENE

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: All-round skiing

WOMEN’S VERSION: Patagonia Capilene

WEIGHT: Lightweight

FABRIC: Recycled polyester

PROS: UPF 35, very quick-drying, thumbholes, bluesign approved (sustainable), no shrink

CONS: Durability not great, sizes slightly larger than normal

 

 

 

ICEBREAKER ZONE

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: High activity levels

WOMEN’S VERSION: Icebreaker Zone

WEIGHT: Lightweight

FABRIC: Merino wool with 4% Lycra spandex

PROS: Built-in ventilation and thumbholes, flexible, not smelly

CONS: Stitching is a different color, expensive, not machine-dryable

 

 

 

MAMMUT KLAMATH

Check out the latest price on:
REI

BEST FOR: Mild days

WOMEN’S VERSION: Mammut Klamath

WEIGHT: Lightweight

FABRIC: 66% polyester, 34% wool

PROS: UPF 35, soft yet stretchy, not as smelly as polyester, good fit

CONS: None so far

 

 

 

SMARTWOOL NTS MID 250

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Normal cold days on the hill

WOMEN’S VERSION: Smartwool NTS Mid 250

FABRIC: Merino wool

PROS: UPF 50+, chafeless seams, no stink, durable

CONS: Hot on warm days, expensive

 

 

 

ARC’TERYX PHASE AR

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | Backcountry

BEST FOR: Normal snow days on the warmer side

WOMEN’S VERSION: Arcteryx Phase AR

WEIGHT: Midweight

FABRIC: Polyester

PROS: Small seams, good fit, scratch-resistant, good warmth-to-weight ratio

CONS: Smelly, peels over time

 

 

 

REI CO-OP HEAVYWEIGHT

Check out the latest price on:
REI

BEST FOR: Cold weather

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

WEIGHT: Heavyweight

FABRIC: Polyester

PROS: UPF 50+, non-chafe seams, 4-way stretch underarm panels, snug fit but stretchy

CONS: None that we could find

 

 

 

PATAGONIA CAPILENE THERMAL WEIGHT

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Cold weather

WOMEN’S VERSION: Patagonia Capilene Thermal Weight

WEIGHT: Heavyweight

FABRIC: 92% recycled polyester, 8% spandex

PROS: Thumbholes, not smelly, good warmth-to-weight ratio

CONS: Stretches and loses shape over time

 

 

 

UNDER ARMOUR BASE 2.0

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | Backcountry

BEST FOR: Slightly colder days, medium activity levels

WOMEN’S VERSION: Under Armour Base 2.0

WEIGHT: Midweight

FABRIC: 93% polyester, 7% elastane

PROS: Sun protection, flat stitching, warm without overheating, durable

CONS: Bit bulky, fits small and not very stretchy

 

 

 

TERRAMAR 2.0 THERMOLATOR

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Pairing with other layers

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

WEIGHT: Midweight

FABRIC: 84% polyester, 16% spandex

PROS: UPF 25, thumbholes, soft, breathable mesh back, lightweight but warm

CONS: Fits a bit too tight for midlayer but too loose for base layer, sleeve length too short

 

 

 

COMPARISON TABLE – THE BEST LONG UNDERWEAR FOR SKIING

PICTURE
LONG UNDERWEAR
BEST USE
WEIGHT
FABRIC
PRICE
RATING
PICTURE
LONG UNDERWEAR
BEST USE
WEIGHT
FABRIC
PRICE
RATING
Icebreaker Oasis
Overall
Lightweight
Merino wool
$$$
5.6
Patagonia Capilene
Warm days
Lightweight
Recycled polyester
$$
4.6
Icebreaker Zone
Warm days
Lightweight
Merino wool
$$$
5.0
Mammut Klamath
Warm days
Lightweight
Polyester/wool blend
$$
5.0
Smartwool NTS Mid 250
Normal snow days
Midweight
Merino wool
$$
4.8
Arc'teryx Phase AR
Normal snow days
Midweight
Polyester
$$
4.8
REI Co-op Heavyweight
Cold weather
Heavyweight
Polyester
$
4.9
Capilene Thermal Weight
Cold weather
Heavyweight
Recycled polyester
$$
3.9
Under Armour Base 2.0
Budget
Midweight
Polyester/elastane
$
4.4
Terramar 2.0 Thermolator
Budget
Midweight
Polyester/spandex
$
4.4

 

 


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HOW TO CHOOSE THE BEST LONG UNDERWEAR FOR SKIING

MATERIAL

The job of your long underwear is to keep you warm by keeping you dry. But, no single base layer will keep you warm enough on very cold days. Rather than relying only on the thickest base layer you can find, you should start with a comfortable base layer and add insulating layers as needed, topping it off with a waterproof and wind-resistant ski jacket.

Long underwear can come in several materials. Whatever the fabric, remember to choose a breathable, quick-drying fabric that will regulate your body temperature and keep you dry while you’re skiing and in the lift.

 

MERINO WOOL

Unlike traditional scratchy wool, the wool from this type of sheep is extremely soft thanks to its tinier fibers. It breathes and wicks well, adapts to different temperatures and keeps you warm even when it’s wet. As an added bonus, merino wool is incredibly odor-resistant and can be worn a few days in a row without starting to smell.

The downside is that merino wool is expensive, and it’s not as durable as some synthetic materials. It is easy to wash but can lose its shape with repeated washing. Some types of wool can also irritate sensitive skin.

 

SYNTHETICS

Synthetic materials usually refer to some kind of polyester blend, sometimes with wool and often with spandex or elastane for added stretch. Although not yet at the same level as merino wool in terms of temperature regulation, synthetics are continuously improving. Many synthetics are quick-drying and effective moisture-wickers. They are durable, stretchy and can retain their structure better than wool, all while being cheaper and featuring a better warmth-to-weight ratio.

The big downside to synthetics is that it lacks the natural antibacterial properties of wool, so it can get really smelly in just a day. On the bright side, they don’t require any special care so you can wash them as often as you need.

 

SILK

This luxuriously soft fabric will keep you nice and warm and it can be chemically treated to improve its wicking performance. A huge advantage is the excellent warmth-to-weight ratio. Silk is by far the thinnest base layer, which makes it practical for layering.

Unfortunately, silk isn’t very breathable so a silk base layer will get a little uncomfortable when it gets warmer. Silk is also expensive and delicate, so it requires hand-washing. All these things considered, silk is perhaps best suited for glove and sock liners.

 

COTTON

While cotton is a popular choice for t-shirts, it’s a terrible choice for ski clothes. Cotton traps moisture and doesn’t let it evaporate, which can be dangerous in changing temperatures. Avoid cotton at all costs and opt for synthetic material instead if price is a factor.

 

WEIGHT

The weight or thickness of a base layer is among the most important factors in determining its warmth. Long underwear is divided into four categories. While these vary by brand, they are almost always expressed in terms of ounce per square yard or weight per square meter.

A lower weight indicates a quick-drying, breathable fabric designed for use in warmer conditions. Meanwhile, a beefier product will be more durable and keep you warmer. When choosing your weight, you should consider not only the conditions you anticipate but also things like the wind factor, your activity level and the way your individual body deals with heat.

 

ULTRALIGHTWEIGHT/MICROWEIGHT

This ultra-thin material is designed for very mild conditions, so it won’t be a good idea for you to use this for a day on the ski hill.

 

LIGHTWEIGHT

Standard lightweight base layers are thin and perfect for layering. With a snug fit, you’ll benefit from great moisture-wicking. Lightweight layers are best suited for milder conditions.

 

MIDWEIGHT

Midweight materials, which simultaneously insulate and wick moisture, can be used as a base layer or worn over a lightweight base. They are the perfect choice for sweaty exertion followed by cold lift rides.

 

HEAVYWEIGHT

Heavyweight materials are usually worn over a snugly fitting lightweight base layer. They help keep you warm in extremely cold conditions, but they are worn looser and are not as effective at managing moisture because of their thickness.

 

LENGTH

Most long underwear is just that – long. However, some people favor three-quarter-length pants which are easier to pair with ski or snowboard boots. Choose a top that comes just past your hips so it won’t ride up.

Shirts can be short-sleeved. But, remember that most base layers are designed to keep your body temperature stable even in warmer temperatures. In Arctic conditions, you might consider a one-piece base layer with a hood, which will keep out the cold air.

 

FIT AND STYLE

The fit of your long underwear depends on the material. In warmer temperatures, you can permit yourself looser long underwear for more air circulation. The snugger or more “athletic” the fit, the better it will retain warmth and wick moisture away from your body. This is why silk and other lightweight materials are good options for the base layer.

Let’s face it, you won’t be winning any prizes for sexiest long underwear. Expensive models are often more stylish but ultimately, the choice is up to you.

 

DESIGN

Long underwear can come with anything from zippers to thumb holes to built-in pockets, hoods and mittens. Some people prefer crew necks whereas others like the flexibility of a zip-up. A few models even boast venting or SPF protection. All these add-ons come down to personal preference.

 

ETHICS

Because they are usually made from petroleum-based polyester, synthetics are not the most eco-friendly choice. One option is buying from brands like Patagonia that claims to use recycled material in their synthetic materials; or Tasc which uses bamboo and avoid chemicals.

Another ethical problem arises in the sourcing of merino wool. If possible, look for wool from sustainable sources that avoid museling.

Top 10 Best Long Underwear For Skiing – Snow Clothes For Women, Men and Kids – Snow Outfits for Winter - Accessories for Ski and Snowboarding – Best Skiing and Snowboard Gear

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