Have you ever wondered how different ski goggles can help with your skiing? Maybe you’re used to skiing in bluebird skies or are constantly battling white-outs or flat light. No matter what type of conditions you head into, it’s important to have the best ski goggles to suit your trip. But in a sea of different styles, lenses, shapes, and colors, how do you know which pair is best for you?

Here at The Adventure Junkies, we’re obsessed with finding the best gear on the market. In this guide, we’ll walk you through how to choose the perfect pair of ski goggles and show you which ones we think are perfect for certain conditions.

 

 

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THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO FIND THE BEST SKI GOGGLES

PICTURE
SKI GOGGLES
BEST USE
FRAME SIZE
LENSES
PRICE
RATING
PICTURE
SKI GOGGLES
BEST USE
FRAME SIZE
LENSES
PRICE
RATING
Giro Contact
Overall
Medium-Large
2
$$$
4.2
Smith Optics I/OX
Overall
Medium-Large
2
$$
4.7
Spy Optic Doom
Overall
Medium
2
$$
4.1
Anon WM1
Overall
Small
2
$$$
4.3
Smith Optics Scope
Budget
Medium
1
$
4.4
Electric EG3.5
Budget
Small
2
$
4.3
Anon Relapse
Budget
Small-Medium
2
$
4.2
Oakley Flight Deck
Perhipheral Vision
Large
1
$$$
4.4
Dragon NFX2
Perhipheral Vision
Medium
2
$$
4.3
Oakley Airbrake
Perhipheral Vision
Medium-Large
2
$$$
4.5

 

 

SKI GOGGLES 101

 

5 THINGS TO CONSIDER TO FIND THE BEST SKI GOGGLES

 

1. FIT

You’ll likely be wearing your ski goggles for hours at a time, so it’s important that they are comfortable and don’t pinch, slide, or cut off your peripheral vision. Many goggles are one-size-fits all, but they also come in small, medium, large, and oversized. Oversized goggles tend to be for skiers focused on maximizing their field of vision — but might be too big for small or medium face shapes. If you wear glasses, there are also goggles with an extra-deep lens area to go over your specs that are generally cheaper than prescription lens goggles.

There shouldn’t be any gaps between the foam and your face. Everything should fit snugly and without pressure points. The temple and the nose area tend to be the biggest problem areas so play close attention to how the goggles feel there. If you feel discomfort when trying them on, try adjusting the strap before tossing them aside as a no-go.

You should also make sure that your ski goggles pair comfortably with your helmet. If the goggles are too big, it’ll cause your helmet to slide back which might be unsafe. Still need to shop for a helmet? Check out our guide to finding the best ski helmet.

 

2. LENS TINT

Did you know that changing the tint of lens can help you see better in certain situations? Though each brand is different, colors like yellow, pink, and blue are best for flat light days when it’s hard to see while black, mirrored, and dark lenses are best on bright days. Goggles for sunny days should also be calibrated to let in less light, while flat-light or low-light days should allow for more.

If you ski in all types of conditions, consider getting a photochromatic lens. These lenses are darker when there are strong UV rays present, making it adaptable and perfect for skiers who go from skiing in white-out blizzards to sunny days.

Some companies, like Oakley’s Prizm, have even created new lenses specifically for adapting to changing conditions that help increase contrast and clarity.

 

3. POLARIZATION

Polarized lenses tend to cut down on glare, making it easier to see obstacles on the trail — especially on sunny days. According to this article on polarization from Sunglass Warehouse, glare can distort color and even cause temporary blindness. Since your eyes won’t have to adjust for glare or squint to see, polarized lenses help reduce eye strain and fatigue.

The only downside? Polarized lenses tend to be priced higher than non-polarized lenses.

 

4. WARMTH

If you’re getting a face freeze on the ski lift, your ski goggles might be too ventilated. The good thing about heavily ventilated ski goggles is that they tend to fog less than those with less ventilation — but the air flow might be too frigid. Opt for something with more vents if you’re skiing in sunshine or less vents if you’re somewhere freezing.

Note: Never use your ski gloves to defog the inside of your ski goggles because it can easily scratch your lens. To find the perfect pair of ski gloves, head over to our ski gloves 101 guide.

 

5. FIXED LENS VERSUS INTERCHANGEABLE

Many frames and brands offer interchangeable lenses for skiers riding through variable conditions. The plus of this is that this often works out cheaper than buying a new pair of goggles for each setting — but you might get bored of wearing the same style after a while. If you’re opting for a fixed-lens pair, make sure it’s perfect for the type of riding you’ll be doing most of the time.

 

ideal ski goggles

Photo by istockphoto.com/portfolio/verona_s

 

SKI GOGGLES REVIEWS

 

1. BEST SKI GOGGLES FOR OVERALL USE

GIRO CONTACT

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Skiing in all types of conditions

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

FRAME SIZE: Medium/Large

LENSES: One black lens for bright conditions and one orange for low light

PROS: Easy to change lenses, barely fogs, stylish, comfortable, comes in tons of colors, UVA protected

CONS: Lenses can be easily scratched due to small frame edges

 

 

 

SMITH OPTICS I/OX

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Skiers wanting a pair of ski goggles that will last for years

WOMEN’S VERSION: Smith Optics I/OS ChromaPop 

FRAME SIZE: Medium/Large

LENSES: One lens chosen by customer for bright light and another for low light conditions

PROS: Rarely fogs, stylish, can be worn over most glasses

CONS: Interchanging lenses can be a challenge

 

 

 

SPY OPTIC DOOM

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Skiers looking for a good all-around lens at a middle price-point

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

FRAME SIZE: Medium

LENSES: One lens for bright light and another for low light conditions

PROS: UV protection, easy to change lenses, comfortable, compatible with most helmets, many color options

CONS: Prone to fogging

 

 

 

ANON WM1

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon

BEST FOR: Smaller faces or female skiers wanting a sleek pair of goggles

WOMEN’S VERSION: Anon WM1

FRAME SIZE: Small

LENSES: One lens for bright light and another for low light conditions

PROS: Great anti-fog system built in, comfortable, easy to change lenses, nice range with two lenses, can be worn over glasses

CONS: Some might find it overpriced

 

 

 

 

2. BEST SKI GOGGLES FOR BUDGET

SMITH OPTICS SCOPE

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Skiers looking for high quality without the high price

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

FRAME SIZE: Medium

LENSES: One lens unique to color option

PROS: Cheap, durable, tons of color options, does not fog easily, great value

CONS: Foam around frame can be itchy for some

 

 

 

ELECTRIC EG3.5

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Skiers with a small face and want to stay away from the kid’s section

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

FRAME SIZE: Small

LENSES: One lens for bright light and another for low light conditions

PROS: Over twelve color and lens options, anti-fog, fits well with most helmets

CONS: Easy to scratch because of the seamless edge

 

 

 

ANON RELAPSE

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Skiers in cold weather who want to pair a facemask to their goggles

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

FRAME SIZE: Small/Medium

LENSES: One lens for bright light and another for low light conditions

PROS: Magnetic facemask integration means a seamless fit of goggles, mask, and face

CONS: Dark smoke lens tends to be too dark for slightly cloudy days

 

 

 

 

3. BEST SKI GOGGLES FOR PERIPHERAL VISION

OAKLEY FLIGHT DECK

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon

BEST FOR: Skiers needing increased peripheral vision

WOMEN’S VERSION: Oakley Flight Deck

FRAME SIZE: Large

LENSES: One

PROS: Extra wide lens for optimal peripheral vision, lens comes with Prizm technology of increased contrast and color

CONS: Lens is not polarized, prone to fogging

 

 

 

DRAGON NFX2

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon

BEST FOR: Stylish skiers who want to stand out on the mountain

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

FRAME SIZE: Medium

LENSES: One lens for bright conditions and another for low light

PROS: Stylish, easy to change lenses, great range with two lens tints

CONS: A gap between the lens and face means powder can get in

 

 

 

OAKLEY AIRBRAKE

Check out the latest price on:
Amazon | REI

BEST FOR: Skiers wanting a classic style that will last for years

WOMEN’S VERSION: N/A

FRAME SIZE: Medium/Large

LENSES: 2 lenses with Prizm technology

PROS: Lenses meant to increase clarity and contrast, anti-fogging vents, easy to change lenses

CONS: Rigid frame might be uncomfortable for some

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