Updated on

The mountain bike chain is the powerhouse of the bike that allows it to move forward. To the untrained eye, all bike chains might look the same, but not all are created equal when it comes to trail and competitive riding. Having the best MTB chain can help make your ride more smooth and more fun.

Higher end chains last longer and come in a variety of colors for a clean ride and stylish look. Cheaper chains tend to be louder when shifting and are less durable, but offer a rider on a budget a more affordable option.

For more of our top mountain biking gear recommendations, check out the Best MTB Chain Lubes

LOOKING​​​​ FOR A GIFT FOR A

FELLOW BIKER?

Check out our gift guide that includes 100 ideas to surprise your biking friends.
From big ticket presents to stocking stuffers, there is something for everyone.

 

Quick Answer - The Best MTB Chains

  1. SunRace CNM99
  2. Wipperman Connex 11S0
  3. Shimano CN-HG53
  4. Wipperman Connex 11SX
  5. Connex 108

 

Comparison Table - Best Mountain Bike Chain

PictureNameMaterialBike SpeedPriceRating
SRAM 10Steel10 Speed$4.4
KMC X9 SL 9Nickel-Plated9 Speed$$4.5
SunRace CNM99Chrome-Plated8, 9, 10 Speed$$5.0
Wipperman Connex 11S0Steel11 Speed$$$5.0
Shimano CN-HG53Steel9 Speed$3.9
KMC K810SteelSingle Speed$4.5
Wipperman Connex 11SXStainless Steel11 Speed$$$4.4
KMC X10 SLSteel, Titanium Coated10 Speed$$$4.3
Connex 108Nickel-PlatedSingle Speed$5.0
PictureNameMaterialBike SpeedPriceRating

Reviews - The Best Chains for MTB

SRAM 10

Specs
  • Bike Speed: 10 Speed
  • Material: Steel

BEST FOR: THOSE LOOKING FOR THE MOST RELIABLE CHAIN BRAND THAT’S EASY TO REPLACE

PROS: Shifts cleanly, high-end, which means durable

CONS: When shifting, the chain tends to make a fairly loud noise

KMC X9 SL 9

Specs
  • Bike Speed: 9 Speed
  • Material: Nickel-Plated

BEST FOR: THOSE WHO LIKE FASTER, MORE DIFFICULT RIDING

PROS: Can be removed and cleaned easily, can handle any terrain.

CONS: Slightly pricey, about $35-$40

SunRace CNM99

Specs
  • Bike Speed: 8, 9, 10 Speed
  • Material: Chrome-Plated

BEST FOR: BUDGET RIDERS

PROS: Lighter chain that is easy to replace, smooth shifting

CONS: Cheap chain so it will wear quicker than high-end chains

Wipperman Connex 11S0

Specs
  • Bike Speed: 11 Speed
  • Material: Steel

BEST FOR: BIKERS ON A BUDGET THAT STILL WANT A SOMEWHAT DURABLE CHAIN

PROS: Cheap, but adaptable to nearly all bikes

CONS: Not rated the best in corrosion resistance

Shimano CN-HG53

Specs
  • Bike Speed: 9 Speed
  • Material: Steel

BEST FOR: SOMEONE LOOKING FOR A CHEAP CHAIN, BUT THAT WILL STILL LAST

PROS: Durable for what the price is

CONS: It is cheap, so it won’t last as long as some other chains

KMC K810

Specs
  • Bike Speed: Single Speed
  • Material: Steel

BEST FOR: SOMEONE LOOKING FOR THE CHEAPEST CHAIN POSSIBLE

PROS: Can buy for as low as $8, easy to remove and clean, comes in gold

CONS: This is a very cheap chain, so what you see is what you get

Wipperman Connex 11SX

Specs
  • Bike Speed: 11 Speed
  • Material: Stainless Steel

BEST FOR: BIKERS WITH LOOKING FOR A CHAIN THAT WILL LAST THE LONGEST

PROS: Durable for any condition, high grade material

CONS: On the pricey end, simple look

KMC X10 SL

Specs
  • Bike Speed: 10 Speed
  • Material: Steel, Titanium Coated

BEST FOR: SOMEONE WHO WANTS A BIKE CHAIN THAT IS DURABLE, BUT ALSO STYLISH

PROS: Extremely durable, come in a variety of colors including: green, blue, pink, and gold, very light

CONS: These are very pricey chains, at around $170, mostly because of the style

Connex 108

Specs
  • Bike Speed: Single Speed
  • Material: Nickel-Plated

BEST FOR: BMX RIDERS

PROS: Weather and wear resistant in any weather

CONS: For long-trail riders, this chain isn’t the best

 

 

HOW TO CHOOSE THE BEST MTB CHAINS

PURPOSE

Just as there are different levels of mountain biking, there are different chains designed for the various terrain you may face.

 

BMX (COMPETITION)

BMX biking comes in a variety of forms, not just the stunt events you might think of when you first hear BMX. There are long trail races as well. Both of these styles need rugged chains to withstand the force you’ll put on the bike.

 

TRAIL

Trail riding tends to be more individual. Depending on where you live and/or ride, bikers can face terrain from light trails to mountainous regions, and even deserts.

This is where bikes differ the most. The type of frame, chain, and tires all depend on what terrain you’re riding on. You don’t want to use a fat bike (a mountain bike with large tires), meant for snow out in the desert. The wheels just aren’t meant for it, and neither is the chain.

 

MATERIAL

 

ALLOY STEEL

Alloy steel is the standard bike chain material, no matter if it’s a road bike, mountain bike, or racing bike. This material allows for less-expensive bike chains, but ones that hold up in many conditions.

 

NICKEL-PLATED

Higher-end bikes often feature nickel-plated chains, both for aesthetic purposes and because they provide even more corrosion resistance. Nickel-plated chains also sometimes vary in color, while steel chains tend to be your typical gray.

 

CHAIN LENGTH

The length of your bike chain determines the number of speeds the bike is capable of (i.e. 9, 10, 11 speed).

Some mountain bikers swear by single speed bikes for a variety of reasons. First, it’s definitely the most challenging way to ride, because you can’t shift to a lower speed when you’re pedaling up a difficult part of the trail—-instead you’re pedaling full speed and at full strength the entire time. For those people that like to build or repair their own bikes, whether for cost saving reasons, or just for fun, a single speed bike means less equipment to deal with.

If you’re a beginner, or just like to make things a little easier, having multiple speeds on your bike lets you coast on those difficult uphill climbs and preserve energy.

Again, the speed your bike is, depends on the kind of riding you’re doing. Long-range trail riding with a few different terrains require a variety of speeds, but not as many as you might need if you’re rising windy, rocky mountains that are throwing a huge number of obstacles in your way.

 

REPLACING THE CHAIN

 

TOOLS TO USE

Certain chains don’t require the use of tools to remove and replace the chain, but most do, especially those with longer chains. For these bikes, you’ll need a chain tool that allows you to push the pin out of the chain so you can remove the chain and make the new one the correct length.

There are videos on Youtube and Urban Velo that offer a tutorial on how use a chain tool and remove and replace your chain. If you’ve got an expensive bike and buy an expensive replacement chain, it’s best to just take you’re bike to a shop and have a professional replace it.

 

CLEANING THE CHAIN

Cleaning your bike chain is something you can easily do on your own and something you should do every once in a while. If you’re riding in mud or storing your bike outside (something you should avoid) you’ll have to clean your chain more frequently to make sure the moisture doesn’t rust out your chain.

The chain tool can help you remove the chain if it’s particularly dirty and needs a more thorough cleaning, but you can also leave your chain right on the bike. You can use bike lube or oil specifically designed for chains, but this can be expensive. You can also use vinegar or degreaser soap. Using a toothbrush, simply scrub your chain clean, rotating the pedals to rotate it.

READ MORE

For more of our top mountain biking gear recommendations, check out these popular articles:

6 Shares
Tweet3
Pin2
Share1
Email
Flip